Aggressive Treatments for DCIS — or NOT? New Research Sheds Light

Another good post about some of the new DCIS research that should give us better answers! If you want more information about DCIS, please join us at the SHARE DCIS webinar on 3/22/17 at noon Eastern: bit.ly/2hRYj8H

DCIS 411

photo-1440968872456-dec3196b9bee - Copy (2)Where are the studies of women (like me) who have taken a less aggressive path for “low-risk” DCIS? 

Until now — they didn’t exist.

Thanks to $13.4 million in funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), a long over-due clinical trial for DCIS has officially launched.

comet-logo

It’s called The COMET Study.

The goal is to learn if women with low-risk DCIS can avoid aggressive treatments and their physical and/or emotional side effects.

COMET stands for Comparison of Operative to Monitoring and Endocrine Therapy. It is a randomized prospective study that will enroll 1200 women at 100 cancer centers throughout the US.

My Role as a Patient Advocate

comet_3In 2016, I was invited to be one of four patient advocates on The COMET Study team.

We have enjoyed the opportunity to keep patient perspectives at the forefront of the study as well as this new website: www.dcisoptions.org

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Answers for DCIS are coming

Great news for those confused about Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS). That includes just about everyone, from doctors and researchers, to patients and their families!

Four new projects and resources are available: COMET logo

  1. A new study called COMET just opened that will look at whether women with low-risk DCIS will do just as well with active monitoring (also called Active Surveillance) as those who choose surgery, radiation and/or hormonal therapy. Watch the video.

    “The aim of this work is not to try and determine what’s ‘better,’ but rather to quantify the tradeoffs associated with these two approaches to DCIS treatment.”
    – Dr. Shelley Hwang, Principal Investigator

  2. A new website for DCIS also opened this week to help the over 50,000 women per year who are diagnosed with DCIS each year in the U.S. Of course, the site is also available for women worldwide.
  3. SHARE is sponsoring a webinar called “DCIS: What You Need to Know” that features
    SHARE DCIS webinaryours truly on March 22 at noon Eastern Time (US). We’ll explain what DCIS is, how to think about it, and what is needed to make rational decisions when faced with a diagnosis.
  4.  A new international research project called “Preventing Unnecessary Breast Cancer Treatment” was recently announced to learn how to find DCIS that will not turn into breast cancer so women won’t have to deal with treatment issues.CRUK DCIS graphic

Together, these projects can tell us how to deal with DCIS, what risk factors may cause approximately 1 in 10 women to develop a later invasive breast cancer, and hopefully, that Active Surveillance works just as well as invasive treatments.

By the way, about 90% of women with DCIS won’t get invasive breast cancer!

If you can’t wait to find out more about DCIS, check out this post or get the DCIS Dilemmas ebook. Stay tuned for more about these projects and other findings about DCIS!

COMET study team

Some members of the COMET Study team